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Spiders

What You Need To Know

There are about 3,000 species of spiders roaming around North America, but only two in the southern and western United States can cause serious harm when disturbed - the black widow and the brown recluse. Knocking down spider webs and reducing their primary food sources (other bugs) is the best practice for keeping spider populations to a minimum. Breda Pest Management technicians will take the time to educate about the important role spiders have in natural "bug control" and what measures should be taken to keep spider population to a minimum.

Types Of Spiders

Black Widow Spider

Black Widow Spider

  • Size: 1 ½ - 1 ⅜"
  • Black in color with characteristic red "hourglass" on back. Black widow spiders usually construct messy and irregular webs located near ground level. Finding a silken sac - which holds eggs - in the doorway is another sign that a spider infestation is underway. Minimize the risk of being bitten by a black widow spider by reducing clutter in basements and garages, which, in turn, eliminates their hiding spots.

Brown Widow Spider

Brown Widow Spider

  • Size: 1 ½- 2"
  • Tan to brown or gray in color vs. black widows, with characteristic red "hourglass" on back. Brown widows produce more eggs and offspring than black widows; the egg sac of a brown widow has tiny spikes all over the surface; a black widow's egg sac is smooth. A brown widow's bite is usually less severe than a black widow bite as they tend to inject less venom.

Daddy Long Legs

Daddy Long Legs

  • Size: 4-6"
  • Brown body with long legs made up of seven sections. Technically not spiders or insects, they belong to a class of arachnids called harvestmen. They typically favour wet or otherwise moist habitats, though some are adapted to comparatively dry environments. Daddy longlegs are most common in late summer and are often sighted in fields at crop harvest. Removing clutter inside your house that could provide a nice spot for daddy-long-leg size resting space is the best practice for prevention.

Brown Recluse Spider

Brown Recluse Spider

  • Size: ¼ - ½"
  • Light to dark brown in color with characteristic dark brown violin marking on back. Signs of a brown recluse spider infestation mainly include spotting one, or noticing webs in and around the home. Known for its "secretive" behaviors, as it prefers to take residence in warm, dry and dark environments, basements and closets are likely areas. Bites can take three or more hours to develop and about three weeks to heal; venom can cause severe allergic reactions, notably in children, the elderly or those with preexisting medical conditions.

Wolf Spider

Wolf Spider

  • Size: 3/8 - 1 3/8" (female) 1/4 - 3/4" (male)
  • Usually dark brown in color, often with paler (or sometimes yellow) stripes or markings. One of the few spiders who do not catch prey in webs, instead they chase with their fast running ability. Over 100 species of wolf spiders are found in the United States and Canada. Indoors, wolf spiders tend to remain at or near floor level, especially along walls and under furniture. Outside, wolf spiders can be found under stones, landscape timbers, firewood, leaves and other debris. Prevention includes the sealing of cracks on the outside of the home and the use of screens on doors and windows.

Orb-Weaver Spider

Orb-Weaver Spider

  • Size: 0.23-0.78"
  • Variety of colors and patterns including orange, yellow, brown, black and white. Spiral shaped webs and rounded abdomen help to identify. Commonly found in gardens and trees. Non-aggressive spiders that will flee at the first sign of a threat (typically they will run or drop off the web). They are not dangerous to people and pets and are actually quite beneficial because they will catch and eat a lot of pest-type insects, including mosquitoes. These spiders take down their nest each day, which is rare and is the only known spider to do that.

Quick Fact

50% of spiders catch prey in webs whereas the other 50% actively hunt without using webs. All spiders utilize venom in some manner when it comes to their prey.