platter of edible bugs dessert

BREDA “Bug Bites” — Will Bugs Be the Main Protein Source By 2050?

February 15, 2022

Learn why squirrels pretend to hide food, how bugs communicate, and which bugs are edible

As pest professionals, we've seen insects and critters do a lot of crazy things. When they're invading our homes or terrorizing our lawns, we might not be quick to acknowledge how fascinating and intricate animal behavior and communication is, but it really is incredible to see how animals interact with their environment. Keep reading for more interesting facts about animal communication and potential nutritional value, in this month's BREDA Bug Bites!

Did you know squirrels have food caches and sometimes they fake hide food just to see if there are predators or fellow squirrels watching them?

Crafty, huh? Squirrels take their food storage very seriously and have developed calculated aversion tactics to keep other squirrels from raiding their stash. Squirrels will also use this fake out method if they suspect a predator is tracking them to learn where they might go to eat so they can strike at the opportune moment. We bet you won't look at a burrowing squirrel the same way now!

Did you know that bugs like ants and roaches communicate using pheromones?

We've all seen the movie A Bug's Life. It's fun to imagine what the world of bugs might look like if they could talk and act like humans but it's all just pretend…right? Believe it or not, bugs can communicate, just not with words. They use pheromones, a chemical secreted by their bodies, to signal different things to their colonies and even other animals. Just like humans have developed an archive of smells that tell us if something is edible or if there's a fire somewhere, bugs like ants and roaches have created their own communication system using a variety of pheromone signals. Pretty neat, huh?

Did you know, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization, there are 1,900 species of edible bugs?

The supply chain issues may be causing you to think about alternative food sources, but has your mind gone to eating bugs? Probably not, but according to the FAO, they argue that treating edible insects as mini-livestock that could be used for either human consumption or to help support other livestock diets. By 2050, it's estimated that there will be almost 9 billion people on this planet who will need to eat, so it will be essential to have enough food sources and agricultural infrastructure in place. Would you be willing to trade your beef burger for a cricket patty?



If you find yourself needing pest control and want it handled thoroughly, don't hesitate to give us a call. The BREDA Guarantee promises to fix your pest problem and keep it fixed—no matter the circumstances. Schedule a consultation online or give us a call at 770-466-6700.