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#AskBreda Your Summer Pest Control Questions

June 15, 2021

Photo by Helena Lopes from Pexels

We love providing Metro Atlanta homeowners with superior pest control service and top-notch information on how to combat common insects and critters in Georgia. But we also know that sometimes you just have a random question you'd love a quick answer for. So we are here to listen!

We asked our Facebook followers to send us their summer pest control questions for us to answer this month. If you're not following us on Facebook, click here to head over to our page and give us a follow so you can ask your question for the next #AskBreda!

Photo by Jimmy Chan from Pexels

Question #1: I'm hosting an outdoor party tomorrow and just realized I have mosquitoes everywhere. What can I do to quickly get rid of the mosquitoes in my yard?

Pyrethrin products are excellent last minute solutions, but only if you already have the equipment (backpack sprayer) and have already ordered the products because you aren't going to be able to purchase pyrethrin at any big box store. Removing and dumping all standing water in your yard should be your first step, because once water temperatures get above 80 degrees, adult mosquitoes lay their eggs and those eggs will develop into larvae, pupae, and then adults in as little as four days. Since the first three stages of mosquito development need water for survival, dumping the standing water prevents those mosquitoes from reaching adulthood.

In a small confined space with no air movement, citronella candles can be a decent temporary solution. But, if these candles are out in the open air and there is the slightest breeze, you may only be creating a neat ambiance and not doing much to help prevent adult mosquitoes from biting.

The easiest and fastest mosquito solution is floor fans, the bigger, the better! Mosquitoes are poor fliers and the slightest wind can blow them hundreds of yards away. Since mosquitoes won't venture very far from their origination point and stay within ten feet of the ground due to winds carrying them too far from their food source, floor fans are an easy way to blow them away from your party (and maybe into the neighbors yard)!

Question #2: I live in a brick house. Will I still need to watch out for termites this summer?

The worker termite is blind and sterile. Its job is to blindly forage through the ground and find anything cellulose to eat. Termites don't know the difference between a fallen down tree, wooden mailbox post, or your garage wall. Whether you live in a stucco, brick, or siding home, you have an equal chance of dealing with termites because every house has cellulose. The baseboard trim, window trim, stud walls, support beams, the paper off the back of batt insulation, even cardboard boxes stacked against a garage or basement wall are all potential food for termites. If you have cellulose at the ground level, termites are going to find it.

Here in Georgia, we have anywhere from six to thirty termite colonies per acre of land. Subterranean termite colonies are the kind that do 80% of the damage here in the US. Their colony sizes can reach into the hundreds of thousands. Essentially, termites are everywhere in our soil, but they are blind.

Here's a quick and fun exercise: take your kids and walk thirty to forty feet away from your house. Have your kids put on a blindfold (no peeking!) and then spin them around a few times before telling them to find your house. After bumping into a few things, they'll find it eventually. This experiment is exactly how a termite colony behaves but with 100,000 moving bodies in the same colony. Feeling lucky? Your best bet is to give us a call if you think you may be at risk for a termite invasion.

Question #3: I keep finding roaches in my bathroom, even after I've sprayed and put out traps. How can I get rid of these bugs for good?

The first step in roach control is identification. We have a few roaches that are problematic here in Georgia. The German roach is usually found in the kitchen and first-floor bathrooms. German roaches multiply quickly and the female carries her egg capsule attached to her until those eggs are ready to hatch. Other roaches will drop the egg capsule and therefore increase the likelihood of those eggs not hatching due to predators (even their own eating the eggs). Insect growth regulator (IGR) products are the way to go with German roaches. Since all roaches molt (shed their skin) to grow bigger, IGR products prevent the roaches from molting and therefore they do not reach adulthood where they can reproduce. Lots of products can kill a roach, but eliminating the entire colony is key with German roaches.

The bigger roaches like American and Smoky Brown can be equally as challenging to eradicate, since the Smoky Brown's are decent fliers. These larger roaches love the trees in close proximity to our homes, so we focus baits around the tree bases to eliminate these colonies. Gutters and attic spaces are usually also a trouble point when we come across these two species. Since roaches can feed off of so many things for survival, making sure the gutters are clean of all leaves (organic material roaches love to feast on) and getting rid of those cardboard boxes in the attic are key. Roaches love to nest and can even feed off the glue holding the cardboard box together, so it's better to use plastic, sealable containers instead.

Lastly, you have to make sure all dishes go immediately to the dishwasher and make sure the trash is taken out often. We don't want to compete with food sources between our baits and your wonderful home cooked meals. If you want more info on roaches found in Georgia, click here to read our guide!




If you find yourself needing pest control and want it handled thoroughly, don't hesitate to give us a call. The Breda Guarantee promises to fix your pest problem and keep it fixed—no matter the circumstances. Schedule a consultation online or give us a call at 770-466-6700.